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The Data Drop News for Friday, February 25, 2022

Irish regulator could halt Facebook, Instagram EU-US data flows in May. ‘Can’t ask people to agree to a data breach’: Belgian regulator rules cookie-consent pop ups are illegal. Data protection becomes a fundamental right in Brazil. Ontario pledges to become first province to protect workers from digital spying by bosses. Over 100 million Samsung smartphones shipped with a fatal security flaw. iOS 15.4 beta 4 adds anti-stalking alerts to AirTag and other Find My accessories. Google, Meta push back against changes to Australian privacy laws. Plus, the latest in privacy-enhancing technology.


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Irish regulator could halt Facebook, Instagram EU-US data flows in May

Data transfers between the EU and United States by Facebook and Instagram could be halted as soon as May, but the move would not immediately hit other big tech companies, according to Ireland's data privacy regulator.


Europe's highest court ruled in 2020 that an EU-U.S. data transfer pact was invalid due to concerns that U.S. government surveillance may not respect the privacy rights of EU citizens.


‘Can’t ask people to agree to a data breach’: Belgian regulator rules cookie-consent pop ups are illegal

The Belgian Data Protection Authority (DPA) has ruled that the Transparency & Consent Framework (TCF) most commonly used in Europe is illegal.


The European association of digital advertisers, IAB Europe, must pay a fine of €250,000 and will have two months to come up with changes to the current system. After that, the advertisers will get another six months to modify websites for compliance.


Data protection becomes a fundamental right in Brazil

The Brazilian Congress has enacted an Amendment to the Constitution that makes personal data protection a fundamental citizen right.


The changes make personal data protection an unchangeable clause, meaning any changes to this theme will have to be aimed at expanding and protecting citizen rights.


While robust passwords help you secure your valuable online accounts, hardware-based two-factor authentication takes that security to the next level. Under the amendment to article 5 of the country's Constitution, which relates to individual and collective rights, a new section has been added, noting "the right to protection of personal data, including in digital media, is ensured under the terms of the law."


Ontario pledges to become first province to protect workers from digital spying by bosses

In Canada, the Premier of the province of Ontario has pledged legislation that would force businesses to tell their employees if they monitor them online, putting Ontario in position to become the first province in the country to protect workers’ digital privacy. Labour Minister Monte McNaugton said he will propose amendments to the Employment Standards Act that will give employees a legal right to know if their company monitors their electronic devices, including computers, cellphones and GPS systems.


If passed, workplaces with 25 or more employees would be required to have a written policy outlining whether managers monitor employees’ online activity; and if they do, the policy would have to explain how, when, and why the employer collects the information.


Over 100 million Samsung smartphones shipped with a fatal security flaw

In a newly published paper, researchers based at Tel-Aviv University in Israel have detailed how they managed to extract cryptographic keys remotely, the keys to the Samsung secure kingdom, bypass FIDO2 authentication and ultimately access highly sensitive data such as passwords.


Over 100 million phones are potentially affected.


iOS 15.4 beta 4 adds anti-stalking alerts to AirTag and other Find My accessories

Apple has released the fourth beta of iOS 15.4 to developers. As promised by the company, the beta adds anti-stalking alerts to AirTags and other Find My accessories.


This follows reports of multiple privacy concerns mostly related to AirTag, as some people have been using the accessory to stalking and tracking others without consent, Apple has promised to add new security alerts in a future iOS update.


9to5Mac was able to confirm that iOS 15.4 beta 4 introduces such changes.