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The Data Drop News for Friday, November 12, 2021

Yahoo officially pulls out of China after new data protection law comes into effect. Google and Salesforce create cybersecurity baseline for companies checking vendors. Mozilla Firefox joins browsers implementing Global Privacy Control. Betting shops and casinos to be able to share players’ spending data. The Government's Secret 'Google Search' Warrant Trap. Apple’s App Privacy Report launches into beta to show you what your apps are up to. Facebook will shut down facial recognition system. Google now offers a clear-cut way to remove images of minors from the scanning eyes of googlers worldwide.. Data watchdog warns Europe ‘is not ready’ for AI-powered surveillance. How A Lightbulb Can Be Used To Spy On Your Conversations


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Yahoo officially pulls out of China after new data protection law comes into effect

Yahoo has pulled out of China on the day the country’s Personal Information Protection Law went into effect.


The PIPL, China’s version of GDPR, lays out a comprehensive set of rules for how businesses should collect, use, process, share and transfer personal information in China and came into effect on November 1, 2021.


Before the introduction of PIPL, consumers in China were not presented with a CPRA or GDPR selector for their marketing preferences. At the same time, PIPL also allows Beijing to tighten control on Big Tech and how it uses data, curtailing how private data is moved overseas.


Google and Salesforce create cybersecurity baseline for companies checking vendors

Google and Salesforce have announced the creation of a vendor-neutral security baseline called the Minimum Viable Security Product, which they said was an effort to "raise the bar for security while simplifying the vetting process."


Mozilla Firefox joins browsers implementing Global Privacy Control

Mozilla has become the latest browser to test the waters in incorporating the Global Privacy Control in Firefox this week, calling itself "the first major web browser" to do so.


The GPC required under the CCPA and GDPR tells websites not to sell or share users' personal data.


Mozilla said the GPC is a prerelease feature available for experimental use in Firefox Nightly.


Betting shops and casinos to be able to share players’ spending data

Members of the East Riding of Yorkshire Council report that betting shops, casinos, and gambling websites will soon be able to find out how much customers are spending,


Rob Burkitt, of the Gambling Commission, told councilors the ‘single customer view’ would be a big step forward for the industry. He added it would mean a casino in one city would know if one of their customers had spent all their money at a betting shop or online before visiting.


The Government's Secret 'Google Search' Warrant Trap

A recent accidentally unsealed court document shows that the U.S. government has been secretly ordering Google to hand over data on anyone typing in certain search terms. There are fears that “keyword warrants” could link innocent Web users to serious crimes, which happens more often than you think!


Apple’s App Privacy Report launches into beta to show you what your apps are up to

Apple has now launched a beta version of its “App Privacy Report”, a new feature that aims to provide iOS users with details about how often their everyday apps are requesting access to sensitive information, and where that information is being shared.


Facebook will shut down facial recognition system

Facebook announced that it's shutting down its facial recognition system, which automatically identifies users in photos and videos, citing growing societal concerns about the use of such technology.


The removal of face recognition by the world's largest social media platform comes as the tech industry has faced a reckoning over the past few years over the ethics of using the technology.


Critics say facial recognition technology - which is popular among retailers, hospitals and other businesses for security purposes - could compromise privacy, target marginalized groups and normalize intrusive surveillance.


Google now offers a clear-cut way to remove images of minors from the scanning eyes of googlers worldwide

Google now offers a clear-cut way to remove images of minors from the scanning eyes of searchers worldwide.


However, the company notes it will not block photos of minors if they are newsworthy or the company determines there’s a “compelling public interest” to keep them online. The tech giant will also only allow removal requests from the photographed minor, or their parent or legal guardian.


Data watchdog warns Europe ‘is not ready’ for AI-powered surveillance

The man responsible for ensuring the EU's institutions stick to its data protection laws believes Europe isn't ready for facial recognition tech that watches people in public.


The EU’s proposed AI legislation bans most applications of remote biometric identification, such as facial recognition, in public places by law enforcement. However, exceptions were made for fighting "serious" crimes, such as terrorism.


Law enforcement and some security-minded governments argue that the police need the technology to catch criminals but privacy activists and some European lawmakers advocate for an outright ban.


How A Lightbulb Can Be Used To Spy On Your Conversations

A team of Israeli cybersecurity experts has claimed that it's possible to use a standard lightbulb, a telescope, and relatively scientific equipment, to listen in on a conversation from afar.


The theory goes that it’s possible to closely watch the surface of a hanging lightbulb while it vibrates in response to sound waves. By observing the bulb's subtle movements with a telescope and a sensitive electro-optical sensor, it’s possible to work out the soundwaves that caused the bulb’s vibration and understand what was being said in that room.

 

PET News

The latest in privacy-enhancing technology


Permutive Raises $75M As It Counts Down To The End Of Third-Party Cookies

Permutive raised a $75 million Series C round from SoftBank’s Vision Fund 2, bringing its total funding to $105 million since the company's founding in 2014.


Permutive started out as a publisher-focused data management platform that used a browser’s local storage to uncover behavior patterns that could be turned into cohort-based targeting segments.


Panther Protocol and Shyft Network Partner to Advance Privacy Tech and Institutional Dark Pools

Panther Protocol and Shyft Network have announced a strategic partnership to accelerate the development of privacy-enhancing technologies, data protection tooling, and mission-critical data attestation services.


Partner Protocol provides an end-to-end blockchain solution, developing the privacy layer for Web3 and DeFi, while Shyft Network offers a public ecosystem for building trust and compliance into blockchain data.


Laika Raises $35M Series B to Help Companies Ace Security Audits

Laika raised $35M in their Series B funding round. The company helps its clients establish robust compliance practices to meet all requirements of regulators and enterprise customers.


Ethyca raises $7.5M, open sources Fides for developers to build privacy tools directly into their codebases

Ethyca has picked up an additional $7.5 million in funding so that it can continue developing and commercializing its proprietary tools. The privacy-by-design technology startup that has built unique sets of APIs, detection tools, and analytics to make it easier for organizations to adhere to data privacy policies like GDPR.


The New York-based startup is also open-sourcing a set of developer tools it has built, called "Fides" so that developers can build privacy tools and monitoring mechanisms directly into their codebases.


Blotout raises $3M seed to build privacy-focused customer data platform

As companies deal with a growing array of privacy laws, like GDPR and CCPA, they are looking for solutions that help them not only understand their customers better but also help them comply with laws in a less labor-intensive way.


Blotout is here to help solve that problem. The early-stage startup has announced a $3 million seed round to help clients build a customer data platform from the ground up with a focus on data privacy.

 

The Data Drop is a production of the Data Collaboration Alliance, a nonprofit advancing meaningful data ownership and inclusive innovation through open research and free skills training. To learn more about our partnerships, the Information Ownership Network, or the Data Collaboration University, please visit datacollaboration.org.


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